ChaBaD Today in Judaism Today is Sunday, Tishrei 28, 5779 · October 7, 2018

Today is Sunday, Tishrei 28, 5779 · October 7, 2018

Daily Quote

Forty days before the fetus is formed a heavenly voice announces, “The daughter of so-and-so shall marry so-and-so”

— The Talmud

Daily Torah Study

Chumash: Noach, 1st Portion Genesis 6:9-6:22 with Rashi
• English / Hebrew Linear Translation
• Video Class
• Daily Wisdom (short insight)

Tehillim: Chapters 135 – 139
• Hebrew text
• English text

Tanya: Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 25
• English Text (Lessons in Tanya)
• Hebrew Text
• Audio Class: Listen | Download
• Video Class

Rambam:
• Sefer Hamitzvot:

• 1 Chapter A Day: Terumot Terumot – Chapter 1

• 3 Chapters A Day: Order of Prayers Order of Prayers – The Text of the Grace After Meals, Shabbat Shabbat – Chapter One, Shabbat Shabbat – Chapter Two

Hayom Yom:
• English Text | Video Class

Source

© Copyright Chabad.org

My dear Israel Shabbat Shalom Tishrei 27, 5779 · October 6, 2018

My dear Israel Shabbat Shalom Tishrei 27, 5779 · October 6, 2018

From the heart of all Israel I like to wish you all your family and friends a blessed Shabbat in Messiah Ben Yoseph.

Please come together in His Love what is written on your hearts.

I hope that you like the Torah knowledge I share…… It shall become later more and more…..

But my greatest Prayer daily is that you organize yourselves all over the world in strong groups. And become independent from the world system where we live in today: Edom and Ismael.

And shall form in real Teshuvah (Devarim 30) The United States of Israel.

Please come and talk with each other about it. Your different groups please show yourself to each other and let we Pray together for unity?

Isa 11:9-16  They do no evil nor destroy in all My set-apart mountain, for the earth shall be filled with the knowledge of יהוה as the waters cover the sea.a Footnote: a Hab_2:14.
10  And in that day there shall be a Root of Yishai, standing as a banner to the people. Unto Him the nations shall seek, and His rest shall be esteem.
11  And it shall be in that day that יהוה sets His hand again a second time to recover the remnant of His people who are left, from Ashshur and from Mitsrayim, from Pathros and from Kush, from Ěylam and from Shin‛ar, from Ḥamath and from the islands of the sea.
12  And He shall raise a banner for the nations, and gather the outcasts of Yisra’ěl, and assemble the dispersed of Yehuḏah from the four corners of the earth.
13  And the envy of Ephrayim shall turn aside, and the adversaries of Yehuḏah be cut off. Ephrayim shall not envy Yehuḏah, and Yehuḏah not trouble Ephrayim.
14  But they shall fly down upon the shoulder of the Philistines toward the west; together they plunder the people of the east, their hand stretching forth on Eḏom and Mo’aḇ, and the children of Ammon shall be subject to them.
15  And יהוה shall put under the ban the tongue of the Sea of Mitsrayim, and He shall wave His hand over the River with the might of His Spirit, and shall strike it in the seven streams, and shall cause men to tread it in sandals.
16  And there shall be a highway for the remnant of His people, those left from Ashshur, as it was for Yisra’ěl in the day when he came up from the land of Mitsrayim.

Ariel, your Representative…….

ChaBaD Today in Judaism Today is Shabbat, Tishrei 27, 5779 · October 6, 2018

Today is Shabbat, Tishrei 27, 5779 · October 6, 2018

Today’s Laws & Customs

• Shabbat Bereishit

The Shabbat after Simchat Torah is Shabbat Bereishit — “Shabbat of Beginning” — the first Shabbat of the annual Torah reading cycle, on which the Torah section of Bereishit (“In the Beginning”) is read.

The weekly Torah reading is what defines the Jewish week, serving as the guide and point of reference for the week’s events, deeds and decisions; Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi called this “living with the times.” Hence the theme and tone of this week is one of beginning and renewal, as we launch into yet another cycle of Torah life. The Rebbes of Chabad would say: “As one establishes oneself on Shabbat Bereishit, so goes the rest of the year.”

Link: Beginnings

• Blessing the New Month

This Shabbat is also Shabbat Mevarchim (“the Shabbat that blesses” the new month): a special prayer is recited blessing the Rosh Chodesh (“Head of the Month”) of upcoming month of Cheshvan, which falls on Tuesday and Wednesday of next week. Prior to the blessing, we announce the precise time of the “moled”, the new moon’s “birth”

It is a Chabad custom to recite the entire book of Psalms before morning prayers, and to conduct farbrengens (chassidic gatherings) in the course of the Shabbat.

Links: On the Significance of Shabbat MevarchimTehillim (the Book of Psalms); The Farbrengen

Daily Torah Study

Chumash: Bereishit, 7th Portion Genesis 5:25-6:8 with Rashi
• English / Hebrew Linear Translation
• Video Class
• Daily Wisdom (short insight)

Tehillim: Chapters 120 – 134
• Hebrew text
• English text

Tanya: Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 25
• English Text (Lessons in Tanya)
• Hebrew Text
• Audio Class: Listen | Download
• Video Class

Rambam:
• Sefer Hamitzvot:

• 1 Chapter A Day: Matnot Aniyim Matnot Aniyim – Chapter 10

• 3 Chapters A Day: Order of Prayers Order of Prayers, Order of Prayers Order of Prayers – The Text of All the Intermediate Blessings, Order of Prayers Order of Prayers – The Text of the Confession

Hayom Yom:
• English Text | Video Class

 

Source

© Copyright Chabad.org

ChaBaD Daily Tanya Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 25 Friday, 26 Tishrei 5779 / October 5, 2018

Daily Tanya

Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 25

Video & Audio Classes

Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 25

וכנודע מה שאמר הבעל שם טוב ז״ל על פסוק: לעולם, ה׳, דברך נצב בשמים

The teaching of the Baal Shem Tov, of blessed memory, on the verse,1 “Forever, O G‑d, Your word stands firm in the heavens,” is well known:

As mentioned above in Shaar HaYichud VehaEmunah, ch. 1, the Baal Shem Tov expanded and disseminated the following concept that appears in Midrash Tehillim:

שצירוף אותיות שנבראו בהן השמים, שהוא מאמר יהי רקיע כו׳

The combinations of the letters with which the heavens were created, i.e., the creative utterance,2“Let there be a firmament…,”

הן נצבות ועומדות מלובשות בשמים לעולם, להחיותם ולקיימם

stand and remain vested in the heavens forever, to animate and sustain them.

As the Alter Rebbe explained in greater detail in Shaar HaYichud VehaEmunah, chs. 1 and 2, this is also the case with regard to all created beings.

ולא כהפלוסופים שכופרים בהשגחה פרטית

This differs from the view of the philosophers who deny the individual Providence of the Creator over each and every one of His creations.

ומדמין בדמיונם הכוזב את מעשה ה׳, עושה שמים וארץ, למעשה אנוש ותחבולותיו

Using their false analogy, they liken the work of G‑d, the Maker of heaven and earth, to the work of man and his devices.

כי כאשר יצא לצורף כלי, שוב אין הכלי צריך לידי הצורף

For when a metal-smith has completed a vessel, [it] no longer needs the hands of the smith;

שאף שידיו מסולקות הימנו, הוא קיים מעצמו

though his hands are removed from it, it remains intact by itself.

Some philosophers apply this model to the creation of heaven and earth, and imagine that once G‑d created them they need Him no more, G‑d forbid. These thinkers thus deny hashgachah pratit, individually-directed Divine Providence — the Creator’s constant and ongoing contact with His created beings.

וטח מראות עיניהם ההבדל הגדול שבין מעשה אנוש ותחבולותיו

But their eyes are bedaubed so that they cannot see the great difference between man’s work and schemes,

שהוא יש מיש

which is [the production of] something out of something (yesh miyesh),

רק שמשנה הצורה והתמונה

where he merely changes the form and the appearance,

The shapeless piece of silver that a craftsman transforms into a vessel (a) already existed, and (b) was innately malleable. The craftsman has thus innovated nothing, and the vessel once shaped will therefore not be dependent on him.

The philosophers, however, do not see the difference between this,

למעשה שמים וארץ, שהוא יש מאין

and the creation of heaven and earth, which is creatio ex nihilo (yesh me’ayin), creating something out of nothing.

As the Alter Rebbe will soon point out, something brought into existence out of nothing cannot continue to exist unless the power that creates it remains constantly vested within it.

והוא פלא גדול יותר מקריעת ים סוף, על דרך משל

This — the creation of heaven and earth ex nihilo — is an [even] greater wonder than, for example, the splitting of the Red Sea,

אשר הוליך ה׳ ברוח קדים עזה כל הלילה, ויבקעו המים

which G‑d drove back3 “by a strong east wind all that night,… and the waters were divided,” and stood upright like a wall.

ואילו פסק הרוח כרגע, היו המים חוזרים וניגרים במורד, כדרכם וטבעם, ולא קמו כחומה

If the wind had ceased even for a moment, the waters would again have flowed downward, as is their way and nature, and they would not have stood upright like a wall,

In the corresponding passage in Shaar HaYichud VehaEmunah, the Alter Rebbe adds the words “without a doubt.”

אף שטבע זה במים, הוא גם כן נברא ומחודש יש מאין

even though this characteristic of water — to flow downward — is also created and innovated ex nihilo.

As the Rebbe explains, not only the water itself, but also its characteristic of fluidity, was created ex nihilo.

Thus, when the wind caused the water to stand like a stone wall, this fluid nature had only to be replaced by the capability of a solid, so that it could stand erect. Nevertheless, since this quality is uncharacteristic of water, this innovation had to be constantly and continuously brought about by the power that first made it possible. (Indeed, were the wind to cease, the water would have reverted to its former self.) Thus, even when a yesh is merely changed into another yesh, the activating force must be constantly present.

The Alter Rebbe now goes on to show how the property of fluidity is not intrinsic to water, but must be created within it.

Certain characteristics do not need to be created separately from a particular being, for they are intrinsic to all created beings; for example, all created beings occupy space. Water, however, need not necessarily flow. Other created beings exist quite happily without this property, and when water exists as a solid (as ice) it too possesses the quality of rigidity. The quality of fluidity is thus not intrinsic to water.

This is what the Alter Rebbe now goes on to say:

שהרי חומת אבנים נצבת מעצמה, בלי רוח, רק שטבע המים אינו כן

For a wall of stone stands erect by itself, without [the assistance of] any wind, but the nature of water is not so.

As stated above, the property of fluidity was something that G‑d created within the already existing entity of water. Though the wind had only to change one yesh to another, replacing the property of fluidity by the property of solidity, this is still considered a wondrous event. And in order for this to have been accomplished, the activating force — in this case, the wind — had to be working constantly.

How much more will this be the case, the Alter Rebbe will soon conclude, with regard to creating a yesh out of utter nothingness. And indeed, the Divine Source responsible for the innovation of the entire universe out of nothing, must be consistently vested within it, in order to enable it to endure and not revert to nothingness. Such a corollary should have been imperative even according to the philosophers. They thus err on two grounds — in their above-mentioned reliance on a misleading analogy, and in their failure to realize that the activating force must constantly be invested within the created being.

Thus, to resume the above argument, if for the miraculous splitting of the Red Sea that only involved the changing of one yesh to another, the continuous action of G‑d was necessary, —

וכל שכן וקל וחומר בבריאת יש מאין, שהוא למעלה מן הטבע, והפלא ופלא יותר מקריעת ים סוף

How much more so, with respect to the creation of an existent being out of nothing, for this transcends nature, and is far more wondrous than the splitting of the Red Sea;

על אחת כמה וכמה שבהסתלקות חס ושלום כח הבורא יש מאין מן הנברא, ישוב הנברא לאין ואפס ממש

surely if the creative power that creates an existent being out of nothing were (heaven forfend) to be withdrawn from a created being, that being would revert to utter naught and non-existence.

אלא צריך להיות כח הפועל בנפעל תמיד, להחיותו ולקיימו

Rather,4 the activating force of the Creator, which initially brings every created being into existence, must continuously be present within the thing created, to give it life and continued existence.

ובחינה זו היא דבר ה׳ ורוח פיו שבעשרה מאמרות, שבהן נברא העולם

This5 [force] is the “word of G‑d” and the “breath of His mouth,” that are to be found in the Ten Utterances by which the universe was created.

The Ten Utterances are the source of the “letters of speech” by means of which all of creation is brought into existence. Moreover, as explained in the first chapter of Shaar HaYichud VehaEmunah, even those created beings which are not specifically mentioned in the Ten Utterances, likewise derive their vitality from the Ten Utterances by means of various combinations, substitutions and transpositions of these letters. Read more…….

ChaBaD Today in Judaism Today is Friday, Tishrei 26, 5779 · October 5, 2018

Today is Friday, Tishrei 26, 5779 · October 5, 2018

Daily Quote

The woman will encircle the man

— Prophesy regarding the era of redemption, Jeremiah 31:21

Daily Torah Study

Chumash: Bereishit, 6th Portion Genesis 4:23-5:24 with Rashi
• English / Hebrew Linear Translation
• Video Class
• Daily Wisdom (short insight)

Tehillim: Chapter 119, Verses 97-176
• Hebrew text
• English text

Tanya: Iggeret HaKodesh, middle of Epistle 25
• English Text (Lessons in Tanya)
• Hebrew Text
• Audio Class: Listen | Download
• Video Class

Rambam:
• Sefer Hamitzvot:

• 1 Chapter A Day: Matnot Aniyim Matnot Aniyim – Chapter 9

• 3 Chapters A Day: Milah Milah – Chapter Two, Milah Milah – Chapter Three, Order of Prayers Order of Prayers – The Order of Prayer for the Entire Year

Hayom Yom:
• English Text | Video Class

Source
© Copyright Chabad.org

ChaBaD Daily Tanya Iggeret HaKodesh, beginning of Epistle 25 Thursday, 25 Tishrei 5779 / October 4, 2018

Daily Tanya

Iggeret HaKodesh, beginning of Epistle 25

Video & Audio Classes

Iggeret HaKodesh, beginning of Epistle 25

This letter comments on a discourse (in Tzavaat HaRivash, sec. 120 in the Kehot editions) in which the Baal Shem Tov explains that though all things emanate from G‑d through His attributes of love and awe, these attributes can find themselves in a state of exile.

The Baal Shem Tov goes on to say that in the same way, a worshiper who finds that his endeavors to concentrate are being disturbed by someone speaking should consider: “Why did G‑d bring me here, where this talker is disturbing my prayers? After all, everything is Providential.”

Indeed it is, explains the Baal Shem Tov: this man’s talk is a spark of the radiance of the Shechinah that has descended and now “abides” in his mouth, in order that the worshiper should exert himself so strenuously that he will be able to ignore the disturbance. (The verb used in the above-quoted version of the teaching is “abides” — שרתה; as the Alter Rebbe will soon explain, the proper term is “vested” — נתלבשה.)

Especially so, the text there goes on to say, if the person speaking is a heathen or a child, then the realization that the Shechinah has (as it were) contracted itself to such a degree should surely bring the worshiper to ever-increasing fervor.

It would seem that the opponents of Chassidism seized upon this statement of the Baal Shem Tov: they could not understand how one could possibly say that the Shechinah “abided” (or even was “vested”) within a heathen.

The Alter Rebbe explains this in the present letter, beginning with the teaching of the Sages that “Whoever is in a rage resembles an idolater.” A Jew, he explains, must know that everything comes from G‑d. When someone strikes him or angers him with words, he should remind himself that at that very moment, a glimmer of the Divine Presence — which provides life to all creatures and to this individual as well — has vested itself within that person.

The Alter Rebbe goes on to prove this from King David’s response when Shimi ben Geira cursed him. King David said: “For G‑d told him, ‘Curse!’” Although we do not find it explicitly stated that G‑d told Shimi to curse David, still, since G‑d’s spirit animated Shimi at the moment that he cursed David, thus providing him with the strength to do so, David considered this as if “G‑d told him to curse.” Indeed, as the Alter Rebbe goes on to explain, a glimmer or irradiation of the Shechinah vests itself even in kelipot.

Throughout this discussion the Alter Rebbe does not actually quote the Baal Shem Tov’s teaching nor the above objection to it. The reason for the latter omission may perhaps be understood in light of the fact that the Alter Rebbe was prepared for mesirut nefesh, literally risking his life, not to be sundered from any teaching or even the slightest gesture of the Baal Shem Tov, even if it would only appear to be so in the eyes of the beholder.1

It is thus reasonable to assume that here as well, the Alter Rebbe chose not to even mention an objection raised against a teaching of the Baal Shem Tov; he merely clarifies the concepts involved, and the objection falls away as a matter of course.

להבין אמרי בינה

“To comprehend the words of understanding,” i.e., the words of Torah,2

מה שכתוב בספר הנקרא צוואת ריב״ש

stated in the book called Tzavaat Rivash(“The Testament of the Baal Shem Tov),”

הגם שבאמת אינה צוואתו כלל, ולא ציוה כלל לפני פטירתו

though in fact it is not at all4 his will or testament, and he did not ordain anything before his passing;

רק הם לקוטי אמרותיו הטהורות

they (i.e., the teachings in this book) are merely gleanings of his pure sayings

The adjective (“pure”) recalls the phrase in the morning blessings, טהורה היא, that describes the pristine purity of a soul before it descends from the World of Atzilut; likewise the verse,5 כעצם השמים לטוהר (“as pure as the very heavens”).

שלקטו לקוטי בתר לקוטי

that were gathered as6 “compilations after compilations,”

ולא ידעו לכוין הלשון על מתכונתו

and [the compilers] did not know how to phrase his teachings exactly. Read more…….

ChaBaD Today in Judaism Today is Thursday, Tishrei 25, 5779 · October 4, 2018

Today is Thursday, Tishrei 25, 5779 · October 4, 2018

Today in Jewish History

• Passing of R. Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev (1809)

Passing of the great Chassidic leader and advocate for the Jewish people, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berditchev (1740-1810). Rabbi Levi Yitzchak was a close disciple of the second leader of the Chassidic movement, Rabbi DovBer, the Maggid of Mezritch. He is best known for his love for every Jew and his impassioned words of advocacy on their behalf before the Almighty.

Link: Kol Nidrei; more on R. Levi Yitzchak

• Passing of Chatam Sofer (1839)

Tishrei 25th is the yahrtzeit of Rabbi Moshe Sofer of Pressburg (1762-1839), known as “Chatam Sofer” after his work of Rabbinic responsa. Rabbi Moshe was an outstanding Halachic authority and community leader, and was at the forefront of the battle to preserve the integrity of traditional Judaism in the face of the various “reformist” movements of his time.

Daily Quote

And He told the moon to renew herself, as a crown of beauty to those He carries from the womb, for they are likewise to be renewed and to glorify their Creator for the name of the glory of His kingdom

— From the Kiddush Levanah prayer, the monthly “Sanctification of the Moon”

Daily Torah Study

Chumash: Bereishit, 5th Portion Genesis 4:19-4:22 with Rashi
• English / Hebrew Linear Translation
• Video Class
• Daily Wisdom (short insight)

Tehillim: Chapter 119, Verses 1-96
• Hebrew text
• English text

Tanya: Iggeret HaKodesh, beginning of Epistle 25
• English Text (Lessons in Tanya)
• Hebrew Text
• Audio Class: Listen | Download
• Video Class

Rambam:
• Sefer Hamitzvot:

• 1 Chapter A Day: Matnot Aniyim Matnot Aniyim – Chapter 8

• 3 Chapters A Day: Berachot Berachot – Chapter Ten, Berachot Berachot – Chapter Eleven, Milah Milah – Chapter One

Hayom Yom:
• English Text | Video Class

Source: ChaBaD org.

© Copyright Chabad.org

 

ChaBaD Today in Judaism Wednesday, Tishrei 24, 5779 · October 3, 2018

Today is Wednesday, Tishrei 24, 5779 · October 3, 2018

Today’s Laws & Customs

• Isru Chag

The day following a festival is called Isru Chag (“tied to the festival”). Tachnun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted throughout the remainder of the festive month of Tishrei.

Daily Quote

In material matters one should always look at he whose situation is lower than one’s own, and thank the good G-d for His kindness to him. In spiritual matters one should always look at he who is higher than oneself, and plead with G-d to grant him the intelligence to learn from the other, and the ability and strength to rise higher.

— Hayom Yom, Cheshvan 24

Daily Torah Study

Chumash: Bereishit, 4th Portion Genesis 3:22-4:18 with Rashi
• English / Hebrew Linear Translation
• Video Class
• Daily Wisdom (short insight)

Tehillim: Chapters 113 – 118
• Hebrew text
• English text

Tanya: Iggeret HaKodesh, Epistle 24
• English Text (Lessons in Tanya)
• Hebrew Text
• Audio Class: Listen | Download
• Video Class

Rambam:
• Sefer Hamitzvot:

• 1 Chapter A Day: Matnot Aniyim Matnot Aniyim – Chapter 7

• 3 Chapters A Day: Berachot Berachot – Chapter Seven, Berachot Berachot – Chapter Eight, Berachot Berachot – Chapter Nine

Hayom Yom:
• English Text | Video Class

© Copyright Chabad.org source: ChaBaD

ChaBaD Daily Torah Tuesday, October 2, 2018 23 Tishrei, 5779

Halachic Times (Zmanim)
Times for Jerusalem, Israel
5:17 AM

Dawn (Alot Hashachar):

5:50 AM

Earliest Tallit and Tefillin (Misheyakir):

6:33 AM

Sunrise (Hanetz Hachamah):

9:29 AM

Latest Shema:

10:28 AM

Latest Shacharit:

12:28 PM

Midday (Chatzot Hayom):

12:59 PM

Earliest Mincha (Mincha Gedolah):

3:58 PM

Mincha Ketanah (“Small Mincha”):

5:13 PM

Plag Hamincha (“Half of Mincha”):

6:23 PM

Sunset (Shkiah):

6:48 PM

Nightfall (Tzeit Hakochavim):

12:28 AM

Midnight (Chatzot HaLailah):

59:43 min.

Shaah Zmanit (proportional hour):

Laws and Customs

The day following a festival is called Isru Chag (“tied to the festival”). Tachnun (confession of sins) and similar prayers are omitted throughout the remainder of the festive month of Tishrei.

Daily Thought

Joy is an overflowing, an explosion.

Something enters a person’s life for which he could never be prepared, and his previously tidy self erupts in song, dance and joy.

Approach the divine with a calculated mind, and there is no window for joy. Embrace the infinite beyond mind, and let joy surprise you. Source ChaBaD

Bereishit 5779 (Genesis 1:1-6:8) by Rabbi Kalman Packouz

GOOD MORNING!  My dear friend Rabbi Saul Rosenblatt’s wife, Elana, passed to the next world at a very young age. He spent years finding the balance between his overwhelming pain of loss and his concurrent appreciation that everything God does is for the best. From his situation he wrote Why Bad Things Don’t Happen to Good People to help others. This is a must read for those who are suffering from pain and loss.

To understand why bad things don’t happen to good people, we must start with definitions of bad and good. Writes Rabbi Rosenblatt, “The Jewish People have a very different definition of bad – and based on this definition, nothing bad ever really ‘happens’ in this world. The easiest way to define ‘bad’ is by first defining ‘good’.

” ‘Good’ is something that enables you to become more Godly. And conversely, “bad” is something that makes you a less Godly person. Torah is good. Mitzvos, good deeds, are good. God Himself is good. And conversely, moving away from God – the source and root of all goodness – is bad.

“Put a different way, good is that which leads us towards self-perfection; that which enables us to become the great human beings we are capable of becoming; that which helps us to find the closeness to God that is available to us. Bad is that which takes us away from God, that which hinders us from achieving our potential.

“Let’s take a look at pain in the context of these definitions. As a rule, does pain and difficulty in life make it easier or harder to rise spiritually? In truth, the answer is probably neither. We have free will and we make our own choices in life. But in looking at the world, it does seem to me that great people in history have more often than not found their greatness through adversity. Greatness is not usually found among those who spend their days lying on beaches and sailing around the world in million-dollar yachts. Greatness is much more often found among those who face adversity head on and overcome it. Those who achieve their true potential are usually those who struggle through difficult situations and build their character in the process. Read more……

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